NEW YEAR- Brand new goals.

My oh my.

I will have to start off by saying 2016 was uneventful in comparison to our past two previous years, and it was great.  So while most people hated last year, I will have to be completely honest and say, I loved it.   Eva only had one surgery, that was to correct her fundoplication and repair her hernia, other than that she has been out of the hospital, praise God!  Eidan did have a scare that we are unsure of, but we are still following up on it and he seems to be fine, God willing.  My husband is safe, and unfortunately nowadays police officers safety is non exsistent.  Last but not least I am working on my business, peculiarly perfect,  which should be launching this month and I am thrilled!

GOAL 1– Get the company up and running by January 15.  Peculiarly Perfect is a clothing line, for children with special needs and all children alike.  The purpose is to bridge the gap (that us parents that have children with extraordinary needs knows all too well) between our children and other curious minds.  There will be two collections launching, one collection will target children’s specific needs, and the other  will be for children to support anyone that is different.  We are all so very wonderfully uniquely made so the faster our kids know that, the better.  I am excited to have a section on the website that features a spotlight child monthly to educate people about our children that have these differences and also to remind everyone that what they have does not define them, it is simply a part of them.

The babies toddlers are taking so many new turns that it has inspired me to also start an instagram account for them (GOAL 2), where I can post daily updates and possibly reclaim my own personal account for myself.

GOAL 3– Be a better wife, mother and build a better relationship with the Lord because Lord knows I need it.  I am doing this with the help of a therapist and this is something that should have been done a lot earlier.  I have allowed a lingering of bad thoughts consume every part of me for a few years now, and I am so ready to throw that shit out of the door.

GOAL 4– Attempt to do a weekly blog…. I said attempt.

I am so excited about this new year, but as that excitement wears off in a few weeks I have chosen to be more excited about every day I have.

Less phone-more attention to everyone especially the kids.  Less talking- more listening.  Less fighting-more loving.  Less “the office”-more “the office”, who am I kidding, I love Dwight K. Schrute.

 

 

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Does it ever get easier?

As a mother with a child with special needs, I have to know now, does it ever get easier?  I can handle the medications, I can handle the therapies that come six times a week, I can handle the spoiled behavior that she learned being in the NICU for the first five months of her life, and the same spoiled behavior fifteen months after being discharged… shoot, I can handle both babies having a breakdown at the same time now.  The one thing that I can’t handle is the surgeries… I can’t handle the weeks prior, I can’t handle the week before, I can’t handle the day before, let alone the day of surgery.

I think I’m always fine but my anxiety manifests in ways my mind can’t control.  Physically the stress takes over my body.  All of a sudden theres something sitting on my chest, preventing me from taking a complete breath.  Just as abruptly my eyes fill with tears, I start making an ugly cry face and I can’t stop from sobbing, not to mention to hide that from the twins is a challenge, God forbid they see my ugly cry face.  Thats something you can’t forget.

I try to keep busy to prevent myself from imagining the “what ifs”.  Leaving me in a state of panic every time I think of it because every surgery comes with complications… of course it does, why wouldn’t it?  Your going under anesthesia, your getting cut open, in this case theres going to be a foreign object put inside, theres the hope that the surgery fixed the problem, theres the pain, and the recovery which is the hardest part.  Theres also the fact that all this stress is put on my 20 month old daughter.

Is she used to it by now?  This is her fifth surgery, her fifth in her 20 months here on earth.  Her two heart surgeries, the fundoplication/g-tube surgery, the surgery to remove her cystic hygroma and now the surgery to fix her fundoplication and repair her hiatal hernia.  Every one just as stressful as the last because her syndrome makes things a bit more complicated for the doctor.  Every one leaves me just as brokenhearted as the last because I can’t do anything to take her pain away.  Every single one leaving me more distressed than the last because as I get to know her better and as I watch her grow and learn and persevere despite the odds it gets harder to know life isn’t promised for anyone of us, including my children.

So should I be used to it now?  Could I ever get used to it?  Will we be able to go for longer than a year with out a surgery?  How about five years? ten? twenty?  Will she be able to live a “normal” life with out having another surgery right around the corner?  We won’t ever know ahead of time, but I can say it is an honor to be the mom of a very special set of twins.  I pray that they always strive to give glory to God and are able to see the positive of everything that happens in their lives, despite how difficult it may seem at the time.  I pray they always take care of one another and love each other unconditionally, and I hope with all my heart that they learn to show their affection more kindly.  For example, I hope Eidan learns to hug his sister more gently, instead of pinning her down on the ground and I hope Eva learns to use a softer hand and touch her brothers head, instead of hitting it with all she’s got.  Theres no doubt they are fighters, in every sense of the word.  Amen.

 

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I feel like I have already made so many mistakes.

The babies are 18 months old and I can’t help to feel like I have already let them down, despite my effort to never do so.  This week Eva had to go by ambulance to the ER because of a high fever and because she was so inconsolable her lips were turning blue.  While we were waiting for the ambulance I had both babies in my arms and I started to cry exactly like them.  Eva was in pain, Eidan was scared and I am their mom and it is my job to help them and I couldn’t.

Through an X-ray a hiatal hernia was officially confirmed and now she needs another surgery to correct that as well as to fix the fundoplication that she already has.  The same fundoplication that and has given us problems since day one.  Even though its been rough we have finally found a system that works for us and were going to back to square one right after this next surgery.  We don’t know if this time things will be better, or worse.  I can’t help but feel right back in that dark room I was in months following the birth of the babies.

I am tired of seeing her through pain, I am tired of being away from my son, and I am tired of only seeing my husband when we switch out from the hospital.  I don’t want my daughter to have yet another battle scar, I don’t want to miss out on my nightly rituals with my son, I don’t want to have to update my husband or get updates of our daughter, depending on who’s with her that day/night at the hospital when she has to go in again.

I don’t know how I am going to tell her how incredibly strong and how fucking unbelievable she is despite every one of her imperfections when she becomes a teenager and she starts to notice.  I don’t know how I will tell her that God made her heart the way he made it in perfect timing and for perfect reasons.  That she was born at a time that it could be repaired because he knew the love in her heart was too much a regular heart could handle.  I will tell her that scar on her side from that procedure is beautiful.  The g-tube and fundoplication scar was put there because she had to learn to eat by mouth later in life, because during the crucial period that babies learn to drink out of the bottle, she was too weak and needed to focus on healing and growing to get out of the hospital to be back with her brother.   I will tell her as soon as the g-tube is taken out and after a scar forms that it is beautiful and I couldn’t wait until I saw that one created.  The cystic hygroma was the first thing the doctors saw when they realized there was an issue when she was still in my belly, and it was a reminder of the long hard road for all of us.  When it was removed that reminder that every doctor said she was not going to survive was gone with it.  That scar is my favorite and I will tell her its beautiful.

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I will always tell my son that he is just as special as his sister.  I will tell him she is no more important than him because I know he will feel like that.  I will tell him I recognized at a very early age that he is very perceptive and extraordinary.  I will let him know I tried very hard to give him extra time after Eva goes to bed so he knows he’s important too.  I know he will feel like she gets more attention sometimes because of her health but I will remind him that she is alive because of him and he is alive because of her and that is a bond that is more precious than any person can describe.  I will remind him that he is always her protector and God planned this perfectly for His purpose.  I will forever thank him for his patience, love and sensitivity that reminds me so much of his father, and is reason why I fell in love with his father in the first place.

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Thank you God for every day and every battle.  Don’t let me forget any of it.

Eva Kirley Devereux

Eva has had an extremely challenging Journey already in her now, 18 months of living here on this earth.  To best sum up her past and current health issues I will simply type out the list of her most recent clinical summary along with links to help explain what each are… Turners Syndrome,SVT (supraventricular tachycardia), Nissen fundoplication (with gastrostomy tube placement/g-tube), premature infant, PFO (patent foramen ovale), pericardial effusion, mitral valve stenosis, milk protein intolerance, lymphedema, lymphatic malformation (cystic hygroma), IUGR (intrauterine growth restriction), hydronephrosis, esophageal reflux, dysphagia, cystic renal dysplasia, congenital stenosis of aortic valve, coarctation of aorta, bicuspid aortic valve.

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Baby Eva.

Little Eva was in the NICU from the day she was born, September 2, 2014 until January 21, 2015.  Before she left she hospital she had her first heart surgery at 8 days old, she had a fundoplication/g-tube surgery at 4 months old and countless X-rays, scans, IV’s and needles.  Before she left the hospital I am pretty sure she thought many of her nurses were her mom instead of me.  Yes, I went every day (not including the week I was sick and unable to see her) but what I failed to mention was I that I was only able to stay a few hours each day (unless she was having surgery where I never left her side), but my time with her in the hospital was not enough.

Her first Heart Surgery was on September 10, 2014 and it was to repair her aortic coarctation with a subclavian flap.  Her h/r Her surgeon took 8 minutes to do the repair, boy was he fantastic… and a bit strange.  As soon as they put her in a PICU room so she could be monitored closely, her nurse gave me a bumblebee pendant with a poem on it.  That was the first time I allowed myself to cry since the babies were born.  I cried for so long when I was left alone in the room with her as she was fighting so hard.  My emotions were held in for so long I could have cried for a for days, or even years.

Her balloon angioplasty in her heart (because of a recoarctation) was November 18th, 2014. This procedure was not supposed to be a stressful procedure but we are a family that doesn’t play by the rules.  She developed a pseudo aneurism and she needed to be monitored in the PICU for a few days.  Because of her syndrome, it effects her tissue and makes her very unpredictable during certain procedures.  She healed nicely but it was mentioned that this was the first time her doctor had seen an aorta need to be intervened so soon after a surgery.  I believe it was at this point that I realized that when any doctor told me not to worry, maybe I should.

The fundoplication/g-tube surgery was mid December, 2014, and it was the one surgery we hesitated on doing.  Nothing about it felt right and looking back we wished we would have looked at other options.  Her healing for this surgery was a nightmare.  She was in pain much longer than they expected and the primary concern for her having this surgery, was her “reflux”, which was still there even after the surgery.  You can imagine our anger and guilt that followed and we still carry with us after this disaster.  There is a small percentage of people that have had a fundoplication, develop a complication called gas bloat syndrome, that prevents them from burping on their own…. well yes, that also happened.  She still struggles with this currently and we have to vent her g-tube often.   That means we have to allow the gas from her stomach escape so she doesn’t feel uncomfortable and start gagging.

Ironically just like her brother, a few days before she was to go home she apparently stopped breathing.  This traumatizing day was December 23, 2014, two days before Christmas.  Nobody was able to tell us exactly what happened, all we know is her nurse was holding her, she started crying and turned blue.  They had to give her air and she started taking breaths again.  After this ordeal I was in absolutely no rush to get her home, but little did I know almost a month later, she would be home with us trying to adapt to a life outside the hospital.

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Eva leaving the hospital, January 21, 2014.